Posts Tagged tools

Column formatting

Here is a quick tip on how to make the output of some tools prettier, for example we can use the mount command which by default looks like this

/dev/sda1 on / type ext4 (rw,errors=remount-ro)
proc on /proc type proc (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev)
none on /sys type sysfs (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev)
none on /sys/fs/fuse/connections type fusectl (rw)
none on /sys/kernel/debug type debugfs (rw)
none on /sys/kernel/security type securityfs (rw)
none on /dev type devtmpfs (rw,mode=0755)

Using the column command with the -t option we can apply some formatting so it is more readable:

$ mount | column -t

/dev/sda1  on  /                         type  ext4        (rw,errors=remount-ro)
proc       on  /proc                     type  proc        (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev)
none       on  /sys                      type  sysfs       (rw,noexec,nosuid,nodev)
none       on  /sys/fs/fuse/connections  type  fusectl     (rw)
none       on  /sys/kernel/debug         type  debugfs     (rw)
none       on  /sys/kernel/security      type  securityfs  (rw)
none       on  /dev                      type  devtmpfs    (rw,mode=0755)
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Introducing Dirfuzz

Tired of certain other tool to crash and take ages to finish? meet Dirfuzz

Dirfuzz is a tool for directory discovery of web applications, by default it uses a dictionary based approach which is in data/fdirs.txt it can also use the crawler module to find links up to 1 level of depth.

Dirfuzz is designed to give you plenty of information fast and without having to scroll through hundreds of pages of output or deal with a clunky GUI.

The project is hosted at github and you can download it and get a bit more info from there:

https://github.com/matugm/dirfuzz

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The tree command

With the tree command in Linux you can get a tree representation of a directory structure, without any arguments it will start of the current dir and recursively go into each subdir to show a complete hierarchy.


# tree
.
├── 1
│   ├── 44
│   ├── aa
│   ├── bb
│   └── ff
└── 2
├── cc
└── dd

3 directories, 5 files

this is just some dirs and files I made for testing, but if you run this on a real dir you will get a lot of output, to solve this you can use the -L option to limit the depth


# tree -L 1
.
├── 1
└── 2

well that’s a bit better, you can also get other useful information like permissions using the -p option

# tree -p
.
├── [drw-r-----] 1
│   ├── [drwxr-xr-x] 44
│   ├── [-rw-r--r--] aa
│   ├── [-rw-r--r--] bb
│   └── [-rw-r--r--] ff
└── [drwxr-xr-x] 2
├── [-rw-r--r--] cc
└── [-rw-r--r--] dd

another useful one is -u to show the owners of the files,

# tree -u
.
├── [root ] 1
│   ├── [root ] 44
│   ├── [matu ] aa
│   ├── [matu ] bb
│   └── [matu ] ff
└── [root ] 2
├── [root ] cc
└── [root ] dd

Others that can also come in handy are -d to show only dirs and -s to show the size of files, but I will leave these to try on your own.

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